Maven

When using third-party components (be it open source or not), we all know it’s a good practice to keep your frameworks and libraries up to date. This is also one of the spearhead in the OWASP Top 10 (2013 edition): A9 - Using Components with Known Vulnerabilities. To help you assess your projects status with regard to this, OWASP.org developed the tool Dependency Check. This tool is primarily intended code bases in Java, .

To start with a cliche: the Java ecosystem continues to develop at a high pace. Various open source frameworks releasing versions, sometimes even multiple versions at the same time. This may quickly turn into a risk But how to deal with it? Basically, you have two options. We’ll take a typical Maven-project as an example, which uses Commons Lang 3. See the end of this post if you prefer Gradle over Maven.

When you’re building Java or JVM-based software, chances are these days you’ll be deploying it inside Docker. Chances also are you’re building it with Maven. Now how do you combine the two? Of course, you could plumb together some scripts for the platform of your choice, but there’s a few disadvantages to that. First of all, it makes you platform-dependant: your build may not work - or behave differently - depending on the platform where you’re building.